Multifocal Contact Lenses — ditch those reading glasses

You’ve turned 40 and can’t see the texts on your cell phone anymore. What happens next?

You have two choices – bifocal glasses OR multifocal contact lenses

Most contact lens wearers can continue to wear contacts throughout their life with a simple switch in type of contact lens. Generally, after age 40, most people begin to struggle seeing up close.  Multifocal contacts offer the ability to see far away AND at near.

Tried them in the past with poor results? The technology has improved significantly from lenses that were available even two years ago and we now have over a 90% success rate with our new multifocals.

  • Advantages of Multifocal Contact Lenses:
    • No more reading glasses – The goal is to eliminate the need for reading glasses 90% of the time
    • Great for active lifestyles – Bifocal glasses can get in the way of an active lifestyle
    • Can wear non-prescription sunglasses – Wear sunglasses bought at the convenience store and see clear
    • Can wear safety eye protection over them

How do they work?

Multifocal contact lenses have two prescription powers in them. One for distance vision and another for near.  The lenses use the normal change of our pupil size to focus the different powers at the appropriate times.  Generally, the reading power is concentrated in the center of the lens.

Focusing on objects at a near reading distance should make the pupil constrict and appear smaller.  This focuses the near power on the retina and allows clear vision for both distance and near through one contact lens.

Ask your optometrist if multifocal contact lenses are a good choice for your eyes!
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Published by Dr. Brett Arnold


PureVision is a trademark of Bausch & Lomb Incorporated or its affiliates. US/ZUS/15/0137

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Author: Dr. Brett Arnold

Dr. Brett Arnold specializes in Custom Contact Lens fitting at Suburban Eye Care in Livonia, Michigan. He graduated from Ferris State University in 2010 with a Bachelor's Degree in Vision Science and Michigan College of Optometry in 2014 with a Doctorate of Optometry. http://suburbaneyecare.com

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